Recover a Missing Child in Wisconsin

Empty Park Wisconsin

Recover a Missing Child in Wisconsin

When a child goes missing and parents don’t know what to do, The Committee for Missing Children has the knowledge and experience to help recover missing children. We have years of experience working with parents of runaways, parents who have had a child abducted by the other parent, Our goal is to help you locate and reunite with your child regardless of why they’re missing. The Committee for Missing Children works with parents of children who have been abducted by another parent, children who have run away, and more.

If you have a missing child in Wisconsin, it’s important to get in touch with somebody who can help as soon as possible. Contacting The Committee for Missing Children is a good first step to make sure you have help locating your missing child. As soon as you’ve contacted local law enforcement (if necessary), you can contact The Committee for Missing Children to get additional help finding your missing child and getting them back to your Wisconsin home again.

Casting a Wide Net

As a parent of a missing child in Wisconsin, one of the most important things you can do is cast a wide net. You need to take advantage of all the resources that are available to you, and The Committee for Missing Children can help with that. We work with law enforcement agencies across the country to help combat child abduction and get missing children back home to their parents. Not only do we have connections with national agencies, but we can also work with Wisconsin law enforcement agencies to help get your child back home.

In addition to helping you notify law enforcement agencies and get help from them, The Committee for Missing Children can also help you figure out what your legal needs are and how you can meet those needs. If you’re the left-behind parent of a missing child in Wisconsin, The Committee for Missing Children is here for you.

Contact Us Today!




Tireless Advocacy for Child Protection

At The Committee for Missing Children, we go beyond working to help parents reunite with missing children. We’re tireless advocates for child protection in the state of Wisconsin, working to make sure laws are written to help parents reunite with their children when they run away or are abducted by another parent.

By advocating for laws that help protect children and working with law enforcement agencies that are committed to locating missing children and getting them back home, The Committee for Missing Children helps left-behind parents during a difficult time.

Success Stories


Child By Wall Wisconsin

Additional Resources for Missing Children in Wisconsin:

Missing Children

Clearinghouse

Custodial & Parental Abduction Legal Codes:

Wisconsin Statutes Crimes (Ch. 938 to 951) § 940.31. Kidnapping
“(1) Whoever does any of the following is guilty of a Class C felony:

(a) By force or threat of imminent force carries another from one place to another without his or her consent and with intent to cause him or her to be secretly confined or imprisoned or to be carried out of this state or to be held to service against his or her will; or

(b) By force or threat of imminent force seizes or confines another without his or her consent and with intent to cause him or her to be secretly confined or imprisoned or to be carried out of this state or to be held to service against his or her will; or

(c) By deceit induces another to go from one place to another with intent to cause him or her to be secretly confined or imprisoned or to be carried out of this state or to be held to service against his or her will.

(2)(a) Except as provided in par. (b), whoever violates sub. (1) with intent to cause another to transfer property in order to obtain the release of the victim is guilty of a Class B felony.

(b) Whoever violates sub. (1) with intent to cause another to transfer property in order to obtain the release of the victim is guilty of a Class C felony if the victim is released without permanent physical injury prior to the time the first witness is sworn at the trial.”

Wisconsin Statutes Marriage and Family (Ch. 765 to 770) § 767.481. Moving the child’s residence within or outside the state