Recover Missing Children in Arizona

Child In Desert
At The Committee for Missing Children, our top priority is to help kids and parents reunite, bringing families back together. We do that in multiple ways, providing left-behind parents with access to valuable resources they can use to find their missing kids. If your spouse has kidnapped your child, we understand that this can be a terrifying time. We are here to assist you.

Our organization has more than 30 years of experience, providing guidance and emotional support, as well as being able to help with some of the financial hardships that can be experienced during a fight for the return of your child.

How We Can Help

We have years of experience navigating the emotional and financial burden that is experienced by the left-behind parent. In addition to being able to provide you with emotional support, connecting you with support organizations and offering guidance, we may also be able to provide financial assistance during this process. This can include helping with travel costs, hotel lodging, and other local transit while you are fighting for the legal return of your child. If you suspect that your spouse has kidnapped your child, and you need help navigating this incredibly difficult situation, please contact us today for immediate help.

Message Us Success Stories

Contact Us Today!




Child And Dad

Additional Resources for Missing Children in Arizona

Missing Children: EEach state has their own ‘State Clearinghouse’ to assist in cases of missing children as well as adults. Please click the following link to visit the Arizona State Clearinghouse. .

Custody & Parental Kidnapping

Please access the following site to review the State of Arizona Legal Codes. On this site, you will be able to review topics such as:

  • Statute on child custody: ARS 25-1006: A child custody determination made by a court of this state that had jurisdiction under this chapter binds all persons who have been served in accordance with the laws of this state or notified pursuant to § 25-1008 or who have submitted to the jurisdiction of the court and who have been given an opportunity to be heard. ’
  • Statute pertaining to the entry of children in databases: ARS 8-810: “If the department receives a report made pursuant to § 13-3620 or receives information during the course of providing services that indicates a child is at risk of serious harm and the child’s location is unknown, the department shall notify the appropriate law enforcement agency and provide the information required to make the record entry into the Arizona crime information center and the national crime information center missing person databases.  This includes information about the child and child’s parent, guardian, custodian or person of interest.”
  • Statute on parental rights: ARS 25-414: If the court, based on a verified petition and after it gives reasonable notice to an alleged violating parent and an opportunity for that person to be heard, finds that a parent has refused without good cause to comply with a visitation or parenting time order, the court shall do at least one of the following:
    • 1. Find the violating parent in contempt of court.
    • 7. Make any other order that may promote the best interests of the child or children involved.”
  • Statute pertaining to kidnapping: ARS 13-1305:
    • A. A person commits access interference if, knowing or having reason to know that the person has no legal right to do so, the person knowingly engages in a pattern of behavior that prevents, obstructs or frustrates the access rights of a person who is entitled to access to a child pursuant to a court order.
    • B. If the child is removed from this state, access interference is a class 5 felony.  Otherwise access interference is a class 2 misdemeanor.
    • C. The enforcement of this section is not limited by the availability of other remedies for access interference.
    • D. For the purposes of this section “access order” means a court order that is issued pursuant to title 25   1 and that allows a person to have direct access to a child or incompetent person